MASTER OF ARTS (PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES) DEGREE PROGRAM

PURPOSE OF THE DEGREE

The Master of Arts (Philosophical Studies) (MAPS) is a graduate program of philosophical studies in preparation for graduate study in theology and for further formation for the priesthood. This degree program serves the mission of the seminary in the following ways:

1.      In keeping with the seminary’s primary mission, the MAPS program provides the philosophical and preparatory theological background required by the Program of Priestly Formation (PPF) for entrance into an M.Div. program, in an environment where the four dimensions of formation for the priesthood are addressed.

2.      In keeping with the secondary mission of the seminary, the MAPS program is available to non-resident students desiring to pursue graduate philosophical studies, preparing students to integrate theological and philosophical principles so that they can better engage the world today.

PRINCIPAL GOALS OF THE MASTER OF ARTS (PHILOSOPHICAL STUDIES) PROGRAM

The goals of the MAPS program are expressed in the following Student Learning Outcomes, which call for graduates to be able to

  1. demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of philosophy necessary to pursue higher-level graduate study of theology including the history of philosophy, logic, epistemology, philosophy of nature, metaphysics, natural theology, philosophical anthropology, and ethics (as outlined in the PPF #155–156, 182) (Philosophical Content: MAPS SLO-1);
  2. demonstrate the knowledge of theology necessary to pursue higher-level graduate study of theology including church teachings, Scripture, and the role of the Church in the world (Theological Content: MAPS SLO-2);
  3. integrate philosophical and theological concepts, demonstrating the ability to research the thought of and dialogue with philosophers of different eras, including modern thinkers, and the capacity to make the link “between philosophical insights and theological frameworks” (PPF 186) (Integration: MAPS SLO-3);

communicate graduate-level philosophical and theological concepts in appropriate writing or presentation style, in a way that is logical, engaging, and responsive to questions asked by scholars or the lay public today (Communication: MAPS SLO-4).